This Ancient semi-natural woodland spanning over 122 hectares is recognised as a site of international importance for wildlife.

Location

On the north side of Hicks Forstal Road, which runs from the A291 near Wildwood towards the village of Hoath
Canterbury
Kent
CT3 4JS

OS Map Reference

TR 194 642
A static map of East Blean Wood NNR

Know before you go

Size
122 hectares

Parking information

The reserve car park is situated on the north side of Hicks Forstal Road, which runs from the A291 near Wildwood towards the village of hoath. Please do not park on the verge of the road that runs through the reserve

Walking trails

Rough tracks which can be muddy and slippery in wet weather and particularly so during the winter.

Access

Wheelchair accessible. A network of public footpaths and nature trails. Paths are unsurfaced and may be uneven. Information boards readable from sitting position.

Dogs

On a lead

When to visit

Opening times

Open at all times

Best time to visit

April - July

About the reserve

Lying on a low ridge between Canterbury and the sea, East Blean Wood is one of the richest of all Kent's woodland habitats. A short walk from the car park and you will discover open, sunny glades and wide rides abundant with wild flowers including cowwheat, the food plant for the  rare heath fritillary butterfly. In spring there are carpets of bluebell under coppice trees of sweet chestnut and wood anemone under a canopy of oaks and hornbeam. It is easy to lose your sense of direction as you follow the trail further along under aged oak trees with nesting holes for greater and lesser spotted woodpeckers.  The bushy re-growth of coppice trees provide perfect nesting habitat for many species of bird including the nightingale and blackcap which feed on the rich insect life. During autumn the fruits of the trees provide food for the dormouse and look out for fungi growing on the dead and decaying wood of fallen trees. Lying on a low ridge between Canterbury and the sea, East Blean Wood is one of the richest of all Kent's woodland habitats. A short walk from the car park and you will discover open, sunny glades and wide rides abundant with wild flowers including cowwheat, the food plant for the  rare heath fritillary butterfly. In spring there are carpets of bluebell under coppice trees of sweet chestnut and wood anemone under a canopy of oaks and hornbeam. It is easy to lose your sense of direction as you follow the trail further along under aged oak trees with nesting holes for greater and lesser spotted woodpeckers.  The bushy re-growth of coppice trees provide perfect nesting habitat for many species of bird including the nightingale and blackcap which feed on the rich insect life. During autumn the fruits of the trees provide food for the dormouse and look out for fungi growing on the dead and decaying wood of fallen trees. 

Contact us

Reserve Manager, Will Douglas
Contact number: 01622 662012

Environmental designation

Ancient Woodland
National Nature Reserve (NNR)
Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)